October 9, 2016

For aviation buffs... live air traffic site

This is a site I see every now and then. I have a deep fascination for aircrafts and the people who fly them.

This is how the sky looks above Mumbai at the time of this writing.

The plane positions refresh every few seconds...


But it is daytime in New York and this is how the sky above JFK looks like:





And this Heathrow (UK)


You can click any aircraft and see which flight it is, current airspeed, when it took off, where it will land and what time. You can even see the route.



Depending on your browser and net speed, you can even get a cockpit view of what the pilot can see.

Visit https://www.flightradar24.com/ and have fun. It's free.

6 comments:

  1. Wow! Some 25 years back I used to listen to ATC stations on shortwave radio and it was real fun to hear the conversations between various airlines as they were approaching Mumbai and the ground control.

    Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. I missed all this inspite of having a 8 valve/ tube SW radio.

      On a different note, my love for aviation goes back to childhood... I spent the best years of my life in National Defense Academy and my ambition was to be a fighter jet pilot. But I got specs in 11th std and it was the end of my dreams.

      But even today, I still watch a crazy amount of videos and meet people from this field whenever possible.

      Delete
    2. You can still enjoy this ATC fun... visit http://www.liveatc.net/

      Delete
  2. Wow! Nice to hear about your interests. My hobby was shortwave listening called DXing and ham radio way back in the 80's and it was a thrill to communicate with hams all round the globe. Thanks for the ATC link!.

    Regards,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am aware of DXing but could not get a HAM license as I was staying in a military area.

      The additional requirement of learning morse code was a pain. I don't know if that requirement is done away with.

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  3. I'm not sure about the latest license rules but I think beginners get a VHF 144 to 146 Mhz without any morse code.

    I passed the grade one after failing once and then operated for some years but the lack of equipment or the availability of spares for home brewing made me quit the hobby.

    Thanks,

    ReplyDelete